Earth, by the way, is a garden of delights

A good luck gift from Marlon Brando prior to filming his first major role, as Superman no less, provoked the following letter of thanks from the late-Christopher Reeve in 1977. Of course, seasoned actor Brando was playing Jor-El, Superman’s father. Please excuse the quality of the scan. As always, a much needed transcript follows. Source Transcript 29th March,

Supermensch

From the archives of Heritage Auctions comes what appears to be the hilarious last page of a letter from Comic-Con co-founder and letterer Shel Dorf to legendary DC Comics editor Julie Schwartz. Usually I’d refrain from posting less than the entire missive but this particular sheet, written on Dorf’s early ’80s letterhead and bearing a striking

Superman looks worse in each picture

At some point in the early 1940s, the following letter of complaint was written – along with numerous others during that period – by DC Comics editor Whitney Ellsworth and sent to Jerry Siegel, the man responsible for co-creating Superman and then signing away the character to DC for pittance. This particular day, Ellsworth was

Superman: The Man of Tomorrow

In 1934, four years before the superhero finally found a home at National Allied Publications, Jerry Siegel desperately needed an artist to work on his as-yet-unsuccessful Superman strip as a result of Joe Shuster‘s temporary departure. In an effort to secure his services, Siegel wrote the following letter to Buck Rogers artist Russell Keaton. Ultimately he

I wish I could do a lot more for you

Since the character’s inception in the 1930s, the original creative forces behind Superman – and now their surviving families – have been disagreeing with publishers both behind closed doors and in court. From relatively petty arguments concerning the aesthetics of Superman’s jockstrap through to more pressing matters relating to legal ownership of the Superhero, all