Getting Star Trek on the air was impossible

In November of 1966, two months after the first Star Trek series premièred in the U.S., science fiction author Isaac Asimov wrote an article for TV Guide in which he complained about the numerous scientific inaccuracies found in science fiction TV shows of the day — Star Trek included. That show’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, didn’t take kindly

Space: The Final Frontier

On August 1st of 1966, just weeks before NBC’s season premiere of the original Star Trek series, two of the programme’s producers — Bob Justman and John Black — contacted Gene Roddenberry and asked him to quickly write the show’s now-famous opening monologue (see clip above), to be recorded by William Shatner. For the next

The links between science fiction & science are well established

The following stirring open letter was written by Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry in 1980, and was essentially a rare public endorsement of the then-newly formed Planetary Society, an organisation started as a means to support the exploration of the Solar System and search for extraterrestrial life. Founded by Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman in 1980, the

Maybe it’s just catharsis. But I think it’s more.

On February 12th of 1965, having recently screened the show’s pilot episode to NBC executives only to hear rumblings of negativity, Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry wrote the following letter to his agent in order to reiterate his vision for the show and make known his unwillingness to compromise its integrity just to make “a

Perhaps we should establish that worth in dollars

An angry Leonard Nimoy wrote the following letter in July of 1976, after learning that a Star Trek blooper reel had been shown in public without his consent. The letter, sent to the show’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, is brimming with annoyance and clearly spells out – not for the first time it seems – the reasons

Science fiction should be mainly about people

In 1969, despite the best efforts of its cast, crew and unrelenting fanbase, the original Star Trek television series was cancelled by NBC after 79 episodes due to supposedly poor ratings. In the following letter, written in 1973 to a lady named Judy Thomases, the show’s creator – Gene Roddenberry – praises the show’s fans, admits to giving Spock a