John is an admirable name

In February of 1892, after one of his plays was mauled by a drama critic, Oscar Wilde wrote the following letter to the publication’s editor and complained — not about the review itself, but about the critic’s insistence on naming him “John Wilde.” (Source: Oscar Wilde: A Life in Letters; Image: Oscar Wilde, via.) 16 Tite

Your disgusted so-called father

In January of 1891, 20-year-old Lord Alfred “Bosie” Douglas met the man with whom he would soon fall in love — Oscar Wilde. On April 1st of that year, disgusted by his son’s homosexual relationship with Wilde, Bosie’s father, the 9th Marquess of Queensberry, sent him the following threatening letter. Bosie famously responded to his

Art is useless because…

In 1890, following the publication of Oscar Wilde‘s novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, an intrigued young fan named Bernulf Clegg wrote to the author and asked him to explain a now-famous line included in its preface: “All art is quite useless.” To Clegg’s surprise, Wilde responded with the handwritten letter seen below. Transcript follows. (Source: The Morgan; Image: Oscar Wilde, via.)