HOPE THEY KEEP YOU

On July 15th of 1971, U. S. President Richard Nixon shocked the nation by announcing his intention to visit the People’s Republic of China and meet with Chairman Mao. Understandably public reaction was mixed, as illustrated by the following: Two of many messages sent to the White House in response — the first from a

IN EVENT OF MOON DISASTER

On July 18 of 1969, as the world waited anxiously for Apollo 11 to land safely on the surface of the Moon, speechwriter William Safire imagined the worst case scenario as he expertly wrote the following sombre memo to President Nixon‘s Chief of Staff, H. R. Haldeman. Its contents: a contingency plan, in the form of a speech

Regarding that pardon

On September 8th, 1974, newly appointed President of the United States, Gerald Ford, issued Richard Nixon a full pardon, thereby precluding future prosecution for crimes he committed during the Watergate scandal. The move was an extremely controversial one. Just days later, schoolboy Anthony Ferreira sent the following letter to the White House. Source Transcript H.B.

Let the stillborn midget rest in peace

A fantastically informal letter from Richard Nixon to President Reagan in August of 1987, almost a year after the Iran-Contra scandal was uncovered. No stranger to scandal himself, Nixon commends Reagan’s most recent speech, offers some advice and proceeds to end the note with a creative reference to the Tower Commission. Source Transcript RICHARD NIXON

I can and will do more good as a Federal Agent at Large

Elvis Presley was an avid collector of police badges and the owner of dozens from departments and agencies the length and breadth of the United States. But, there was one badge in particular that he was desperate to get his hands on—one which had, for a long time, proven elusive: a badge from the Bureau