I can’t spell. I’m very upset

April 1964: The U.S. Department of Labor introduces new rules relating to foreign musicians entering the country, in effect making it more difficult for them to do so unless they can demonstrate a unique talent. The very recent onset of Beatlemania in America, coupled with misleading reports by the American press regarding this issue, results

And don’t get me started on the Scoutmasters

To conclude today’s child-centric trio of letters, I present to you a beautifully observant, expertly written complaint from a schoolboy by the name of Richard Millington which verges on comedy gold. The letter was sent to President Kennedy in February of 1963, just a few years after the U.S. government introduced the President’s Council on

Confide in me, Tom

In his later years, comedian Groucho Marx became the unlikely penpal of poet T. S. Eliot, and the following is just one of many witty letters sent back and forth between the pair. Some background: previous to this one, Marx had started a letter informally with “Dear Tom, If this isn’t your first name, I’m

I leave it in your capable hands

For their ninth studio album, Sticky Fingers, The Rolling Stones aimed for the top and asked Andy Warhol to design what would become one of the most popular album covers of all time: a sleeve featuring a shot of Joe Dallesandro‘s crotch, a workable zip, and for the first time the band’s tongue and lips logo as

And a bomb was dropped

Written in April 1966 and now declassified, the following letter from then Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, W. J. Howard, to Chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, Chet Holifield, lists four separate incidents which resulted in nuclear weapons being lost and never recovered. According to Howard, the first two incidents listed in

All you need is love

Stuart Sutcliffe joined The Beatles as bassist in May, 1960 (they were then known as The Silver Beatles). 15 months later, he left the band and enrolled in the Hamburg College of Art. However just months before he parted ways with the band, on the 31st April, 1961 – a date which doesn’t actually exist

How can we stamp out this menace?

A flurry of letters similar to the one below – this particular example written by an irate parent to then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in 1964 – resulted in a 31 month investigation by the FBI into the recording of the song Louie Louie by The Kingsmen. The initial uproar was a result of claims

I will not sign this letter

In 1961, New York Post columnist Leonard Lyons contacted John F. Kennedy after seeing Presidential autographs for sale in a store and informed him of the prices. At the time, George Washington’s was priced at $175, Ulysses S. Grant’s at $55, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s at $75, Teddy Roosevelt’s at $67.50, and JFK’s at $75. Below